Perfection

Each work is distinct. That’s all I look for. Has this served its purpose? Does it feel real? Is it honest? All else is window dressing.

Problem Machine

The arguments against perfectionism are well-established at this point. It’s easy to spend forever trying to make something better, to improve it by repeated half-strides towards some theoretical optimum. It’s easy to get trapped in that mindset and thereby never end up making anything, to end up with inferior skills because you didn’t practice because you were too afraid to fail in your creation. And, in the end, this perfection you’re chasing doesn’t exist, it’s a symbol without a reality behind it, and you’re just charging at windmills that look like giants.

Okay, but: Let’s forget about all that. Let’s say that thing you’re making, that thing you’ve been working on and care so much about and that thing that’s going to really show people what you’re going for this time and maybe make them understand: If you could make that thing perfect, would you?

The obvious answer here is…

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